Who was Bram Fischer and why was he considered a struggle stalwart?

Who was Bram Fischer and why was he considered a struggle stalwart?

- Bram Fischer grew up privileged in South Africa during the apartheid era

- Yet, he became a hero for the work he did to free the majority from oppression

- The whit struggle stalwarts dedicated his entire life to the cause and he even left an impression on Nelson Mandela

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Not all white people agreed with Apartheid and some even risked everything to fight the injustice against people of colour.

On Wednesday, Khaya Dlanga told the story of Bram Fischer on Twitter. Fischer was privileged growing up, yet he became one of the most beloved icons during the struggle.

As the son of the Judge President of the Orange Free State, Fischer had it all from a very young age. He went on to represent SA's national rugby team and was set to one day work in the Supreme Court.

However, he found apartheid "morally indefensible" and decided to do something about it.

Fischer went to visit the Rivonia trialists shortly after they were imprisoned on Robben Island, little did Mandela or any other of the prisoners know he lost his wife in a car crash only a week prior to his visit- a fact he withheld from hem because he did not want to concern them.

When the Communist party was banned, Fischer returned to SA from his exile in England, where he worked underground to help oppose the Apartheid regime.

Briefly.co.za learned he was disbarred in 1965 despite being the longest-serving member of the Johannesburg Bar Council.

However, things went from bad to worse and later that year he was arrested and sentenced to life in jail.

In court he said, ”I accept, my Lord, the general rule that for the protection of a society, laws should be obeyed. But when the laws themselves are immoral and require the citizen to take part in an organised system of oppression... then I believe that a higher city arises...”

He was then diagnosed brain cancer while in prison and they even refused him medical treatment after he fell.

"To show the extent to which the apartheid government felt betrayed by its own, the prison officials demanded his ashes from his family after the funeral. In 2003, the South African high court posthumously Bram Fischer to the roll of advocates," Dlanga wrote on Twitter.

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Briefly South Africa has gone through the list of current and immediate past African leaders and is ready to present Top-5 tips on how to be an average African president.

Source: Briefly.co.za

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