The Bosasa saga illustrates exactly how bribes have destroyed the Constitution

The Bosasa saga illustrates exactly how bribes have destroyed the Constitution

The moment the first bribe ( or 'order of chicken' for those in the know) passed from the hands of BOSASA to a government official, a part of the South African Constitution died. Those entrusted with the nation appear to have sold it to the highest bidder.

PAY ATTENTION: Click “See First” under the “Following” tab to see Briefly.co.za News on your News Feed!

When BOSASA paid its first bribe to member of Parliament the Constitution of South Africa suffered a tremendous blow.

Angelo Agrizzi has spent the last few days laying the corruption in our government bare for the nation to see, probably one of the first true acts of transparency the country has seen in a long time.

Numerous government officials have been implicated in corruption, bribery and money laundering. The tender system, meant to ensure economic empowerment and fairness, has been shamelessly exploited.

PAY ATTENTION: Save mobile data with FreeBasics: Briefly is now available on the app

A successful and well-known company manipulated and maneuvered its way to the top, trampling the South African taxpayer on its way up.

Bribes were used to ensnare unassuming people into the 'trap' BOSASA laid for them. Blinded by their own greed, numerous government officials fell for it.

Government officials, who smiled sweetly while they said their oaths as they rose to power, who were appointed to protect the laws the country stood for, have been exposed.

READ ALSO: Agrizzi implicates ex-president Jacob Zuma in R300k monthly bribe from BOSASA

Of course, the allegations made my Agrizzi will be thoroughly investigated and in due course prosecuted.

However, the mere fact that a man, who has made his wealth in the grasp of BOSASA, has stood up to testify (most likely in an attempt to gain immunity with his compliance) signifies that what he claims will most likely be true.

Agrizzi's evidence has provided the country with the insight it needs to truly grasp the term 'State Capture' and what it entails for a very young democratic nation.

Former president Jacob Zuma once said that South Africa would regret the establishment in the inquiry, in what many presumed was his last attempt to impede a probe into his alleged corruption.

Perhaps, in light of recent events, it had been his own strange way of trying to shield South Africa from the truth of what really happens in Parliament.

Enjoyed reading our story? Download BRIEFLY's news app on Google Play now and stay up-to-date with major South African news!

Source: Briefly.co.za

Related news
Patricia de Lille's Good political party launch 'Aunty Pat for Premier' campaign

Patricia de Lille's Good political party launch 'Aunty Pat for Premier' campaign

Patricia de Lille's Good political party launch 'Aunty Pat for Premier' campaign
Briefly.co.za
Mailfire view pixel