How and why a computer crashed the Ethiopian plane that killed 157

How and why a computer crashed the Ethiopian plane that killed 157

-The plane crash that killed 157 people had Ethiopian Airlines making headlines for all the worst reasons

- The recently-released crash report indicates that a faulty computer system may well be the culprit in the devastating crash

- Briefly.co.za explores what happened that day and how a computer ended up being the downfall of the Boeing 737 Max models

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For the second time in just a few months, a brand-new Boeing aircraft came hurtling down to earth, killing every soul on board.

According to Bloomberg, the alarms had started ringing just seconds after Flight 302 took off from Addis Ababa.

Speed and altitude readings had started issuing warnings and a device called a stick shaker had activated to warn of an impending aerodynamic stall.

However, a stall was not imminent. A computer had been giving off false readings from a sensor in the plane's nose. This malfunction had set off an anti-stall feature that had sent the jet into a nosedive.

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READ ALSO: Tragic Ethiopian Airlines plane crash claims lives of 157 people

This system has been implicated in the Indonesian crash that had taken a further 189 lives.

The pilots on board had attempted to counteract the dive with measures suggested after the previous crash, but they had made one fatal mistake, according to a former accident investigator:

“The thrust was full bore the whole way. That is extremely curious.”

Briefly.co.za reported at the time that 157 people had perished in the flight that had by all appearances been doomed from the start.

Dagmawit Moges, Ethiopian Transport Minister, commented that the pilots had followed procedures issued following an October crash of a Lion Air jet.

The minister had insisted that Boeing should revise its flight-control systems and that aviation authorities should verify the issues that have been addressed.

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The recent disasters have heralded a crisis for Boeing, one of the biggest in its 100-year history, according to 2OceansVibes News. The Boeing 737 Max, accounting for a third of the company's profit, has been grounded on a global scale.

The crash report indicated that liftoff had gone off as normal, with pilots taking off at almost full power. However, instead of reducing thrust after takeoff, the speed had remained the same for the duration of the short flight.

The report further states that the plane had been flying at twice the usual speed of the low altitude that they had been flying in. This indicates that there may well have been other contributing factors to the crash, but the safety of the Boeing model is still currently under investigation.

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Source: Briefly.co.za

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