Students at university develop brilliant new treatment for brain cancer

Students at university develop brilliant new treatment for brain cancer

- A group of pharmacy students at the University of Findlay have made great strides in developing a new treatment for brain cancer

- The researchers have used a molecule which is actually also found in curry dishes

- The new drug has passed the initial stage and will move on to be tested on animals and then humans

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Statistics are showing that the risk of cancer diagnosis in on the rise, with as many as 40% of Americans being diagnosed with the dread disease.

Glioblastoma is an incredibly aggressive form of brain cancer that’s been the bane of many researchers’ existence.

However, NBC 24 News has reported that a group of pharmacy students at the University of Findlay have made great progress in developing a new treatment.

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As a result of the complexity to remove the cancer, less than 10% of patients survive for longer than five years.

Jacob Reyes, UF College of Pharmacy graduate student researcher, said: “"Looking at activity we've seen from drug compounds treating glioblastoma in the past, we've kind of used a molecule called chalcone, that's just a type of drug molecule, but it's something actually found in curry I guess, the food curry."

Dr. Rahul Khupse is a medical chemist who is working with the group and he revealed that while growing up in India, he learnt about the anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties that chalcone has.

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The researchers have developed a new compound which they’ve called "RK-15."

What makes RK-15 different is that it is selective in that it only targets the cancer cells and spares the healthy cells.

Briefly.co.za understands that the new drug has passed the initial stage and will move on to being tested on animals and eventually on humans.

The team have currently been working on the treatment for two years and it is generally estimated that the turnaround time is between 10 to 15 years for a new drug to go from lab to patient.

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Source: Briefly.co.za

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