Pan-African writer blames Madiba for xenophobic attacks in SA

Pan-African writer blames Madiba for xenophobic attacks in SA

- The latest xenophobic attacks in South Africa witnessed the killing of other African nationals, including Ghanaians, and the destruction of properties

- The attacks continue to receive global condemnation, especially from Africans

- However, Pan-African wrtier, Zudana Azudaa, has amplified the role of the late Nelson Mandela in xenophobia in South Africa

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Following the recent xenophobic attacks on other African nationals in South Africa, Zudana Azudaa, a writer and Pan-Africanist, has penned down his experience and who he claims is to be blamed for xenophobia by South Africans.

Zudana Azudaa stated in a write-up to Briefly.co.za that iconic Nobel Peace Prize winner, Nelson Mandela, is to be blamed for the xenophobic attacks on other African nationals in South Africa.

He titled his piece: Nelson Mandela is to be blamed for the xenophobic attacks in South Africa.

Zudana Azudaa writes:

"It is 3:15 am, I’m supposed to be asleep but I can't sleep. The pain, trauma, the agony my brother in South Africa might be going through keeps me awake. I wish what I watched on social media was just a movie. [That] in just a matter of minutes, these horrifying pictures would have been far gone in my mind.
"Between 1948 and 1994, South Africans lived under a racist system of laws called apartheid. The main characters who opposed, resisted and subsequently claimed to have dismantled apartheid are the cause of xenophobic attack in South Africa today.

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Between 1948 and 1994, South Africans lived under a racist system of laws called apartheid. The main characters who opposed, resisted and subsequently claimed to have dismantled apartheid are the cause of xenophobic attack in South Africa today.
"They are to be blamed for this killing of Nigerians and other African nationals (including my own nationals, Ghanaians) living in South Africa.
"Key among them is the Noble Peace Prize winner, Nelson Mandela Madiba. His bones will never rest. He betrayed the very African people who helped him during the days of apartheid.
"Colonisation in South Africa in itself is one of a kind. The official colonisation of South Africa as a country by the Whites in Britain ended in 1961 when the country became a Republic. Then came the internal colonization by same white people, now referred as White Afrikaners.
"The era of this internal colonisation travelled through to 1994 when the country became a democracy. The indigenous black people that form the majority then had the opportunity to rule their own country.
"Nelson Mandela's electoral victory in 1994 was the victory for the indigenous black people, a victory for Africa, a victory that gives power back to the real owners of the South African land.
"This, for me was supposed to be the turning point for blacks in South Africa, the point where the oppressor was expected to return to where he came from.
"The period to have marked the final return of the colonial masters to their ancestral land from Africa. It was the moment to clear and correct all the inequalities created by decades of apartheid.
"The premise of apartheid was that whites were superior to Africans and the basis of it was to entrench white supremacy forever.
"The social and economic inequalities created during the era of colonization and apartheid could not have been re-established just by changing the constitution of the country.
"There were several measures during this era that were taken to promote racial inequalities. The educational system in South Africa was set up to favour whites.

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"White education centred on reading, language and maths, whilst black education trained people to become unskilled labourers so that they could not compete with whites for better paying jobs.
"Again the passage of the Group Areas Act of 1950 also promoted inequalities in South Africa. This forced the blacks to move out of their homes and sent to live in the less developed areas whilst the whites live in the most developed areas. This created mass displacement because many of the blacks still lived far from the developed regions.
"Even though it's no longer mandated by law, it is difficult for the blacks to find place in the developed regions.
"We enter into a covenant that we shall build the society in which all South Africans, both black and white, will be able to walk tall, without any fear in their hearts, assured of their inalienable right to human dignity - a rainbow nation at peace [with] itself and the ..." (African National Congress, 1994) Nelson Mandela quoted in his [inaugural speech] as first black and Democratic leader was a fallacy, was deceitful, was not a true representation."

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Source: Briefly.co.za

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