It's official: Zuma will stand trial for corruption in Thales saga

It's official: Zuma will stand trial for corruption in Thales saga

- Jacob Zuma has lost his application to permanently set aside corruption charges against him

- The Pietermaritzburg High Court dismissed the former president's application with costs

- This ruling comes just days before Zuma is to stand trial over his involvement in the infamous Thales debacle

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Former president Jacob Zuma will stand trial and answer to 18 charges of fraud, money laundering, corruption and racketeering.

TimesLIVE reports that the Pietermaritzburg High Court dismissed Zuma's application for a permanent stay of prosecution.

Dating back to 2005 and relating to 783 payments (over R4 million in total), Zuma allegedly received kickbacks from his former financial adviser, Schabir Shaik, News24 reports.

Thales, the arms company that stands as Zuma's co-accused in the matter, will also be facing similar charges in the debacle.

READ ALSO: Zuma trial: 'Dead' former Thales boss, witness found alive in Europe

Briefly.co.za reported that an unexpected twist in the matter had seen a 'dead' former Thales boss, Alain Thétard, returning to life.

In court documents, Zuma himself had claimed the key witness had perished, commenting that:

"Thétard is now deceased and cannot assist the prosecution and me to explain the fax once and for all. This prejudice is indeed insurmountable and grotesque."

Thétard had been the only person able to decode correspondence that had been sent between the two parties, with his sudden resurrection key to the trial that Zuma had attempted to avoid.

In 2004, Shaik had stood trial with the Durban High Court finding him guilty on two counts of corruption and one count of fraud.

Sentenced to 15 years' imprisonment on the corruption charges and 3 years on the fraud charges, Shaik only served two years and four months before being released on medical parole.

The trial is set to begin on Tuesday, 15 October, seeking to finalise a matter that has lingered for far too long.

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Source: Briefly.co.za

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