Mnangagwa acknowledges his people's suffering after grim Christmas

Mnangagwa acknowledges his people's suffering after grim Christmas

- President Emmerson Mnangagwa admits that Zimbabwean citizens are suffering

- While Mzansi partied the holidays away, Zimbabweans spent Christmas in a sorry state

- In the grips of the worst economic crisis seen this decade, the nation's people are starving

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While President Cyril Ramaphosa urged South Africans to rest this holiday, Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa's message was far more sinister.

Christmas was marked in the neighbouring country with shortages in everything from electricity and fuel to cash.

With nearly 7 million citizens facing hunger amidst a devastating drought, the nation is suffering with the second-highest inflation rate in the world.

Reaching out to Zimbabweans on Wednesday, Mnangagwa took stock of the damage:

“I know that many of you still suffer. I am not blind to your situation, nor am I deaf to your cries. I commit to you that we will continue to reform with an eye on the long term; for we must not reform only for ourselves, but for our children and our children’s children.”

READ ALSO: Mbeki mediates critical talks in Zimbabwe amid political crisis

BusinessLIVE reports that the country's opposition leader, Nelson Chamisa of the Movement for Democratic Change, says this was one of the worst holidays in living memory due to Mnangagwa's failure to commit to the nation's wellbeing:

"Instead of dispensing love at Christmas, Mnangagwa was dispensing agony to his people. The people are suffering because we have deprived them of happiness and merrymaking. They are without cash, without fuel, without electricity, without water and even without freedom."

Briefly.co.za reported that former president Thabo Mbeki had travelled to the country in the hopes of mediating between Mnangagwa and Chamisa.

The opposition party has point blank refused to accept Robert Mugabe's successor as their leader, making for an uncomfortably difficult political dialogue between the two.

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Source: Briefly.co.za

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