Botswana to start elephant hunting with an auction in February

Botswana to start elephant hunting with an auction in February

- Those interested in hunting elephants in Botswana have been given an opportunity to bid since Friday, 7 February

- Botswana will be holding its major auction for the right to hunt elephants since the ban to hunt the animals was lifted in 2019

- Interested bidders will be paying the sum of $18 300 as refundable deposit

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The government of Botswana has announced that it will be holding its first major auction for the right to hunt elephants since the ban to hunt the animals was lifted in May 2019.

The country, which has the world's biggest elephant population, is offering seven packages of 10 elephants each.

According to Bloomberg, Botswana is home to about 130 000 elephants.

Auction It Ltd is operating the sales on behalf of the government of Botswana.

As per a report, those interested in bidding are required to pay a refundable deposit of $18 300.

The auction began in Gaborone on Friday, 7 February.

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The government said hunting will not drastically reduce the size of the elephant population, adding that local communities will benefit from the proceeds generated from the sport.

Meanwhile, Briefly.co.za learnt that a surprising occurrence was recorded in Borno state, northeastern Nigeria when a herd of around 250 elephants was spotted in a part of the state close to the borders with Cameroon and Chad.

The sighting of the herd was the first reported sighting of elephants in the region since the insurgency in that part of the country began a decade ago.

Tunde Marokinyo, the co-founder of Africa Nature Investors, said the sighting of the herd implied that Nigeria’s elephant population had effectively doubled.

The herd was spotted a few kilometres from Rann during a humanitarian mission carried out by helicopter.

Before the insurgency began, hundreds of elephants were said to migrate through the region when Sambisa forest served as a game reserve the size of Belgium and the Netherlands.

Three major migration routes passed through the Sambisa Forest. These same routes that follow water sources are used by insurgents to escape the military bombardment.

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Source: Briefly.co.za

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