Covid-19: Scientists in ongoing-process of developing a vaccine

Covid-19: Scientists in ongoing-process of developing a vaccine

- A team of medical researchers is developing a vaccine for coronavirus from a strain virus, Sars-Cov-2, that causes it

- With the process of combining antigens from the causative virus with a "backbone" protein from a flu virus, the scientists hope to come up with a cure within weeks

- According to them, when the vaccine is ready, it will be passed into a patient's body through the lungs, mimicking the way Covid-19 gets into the system

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A dedicated team of local researchers is working on a Covid-19 vaccine with a modification process that can be completed within three weeks to combat Sars-Cov-2 virus and go through a human trial in six months.

It should be noted that Sars-Cov-2 is a kind of virus strain that causes the deadly coronavirus and it is a respiratory illness.

The team involved in the vaccine development is called Home-grown Esco Aster and they are working with the United States biotechnology company, Vivaldi Biosciences, as they combine proteins from different viruses to find a cure, StraitsTimes reports.

Nandini Prabhakar beside the machine being used in the ongoing process of developing the vaccine. Photo source: StraitsTimes

Nandini Prabhakar beside the machine being used in the ongoing process of developing the vaccine. Photo source: StraitsTimes
Source: UGC

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The vaccine they are working on is tagged Esco-Aster DeltaCov and was made by putting together antigens from Sars-Cov-2 virus with “backbone” protein from a flu virus.

"Viruses actually want to lie low and not be recognised - they want to evade the immune system and not cause any response.
"By having this backbone... we can awaken the immune system to realise there's a novel virus and create the antibodies needed to kill it," Esco Aster’s chief executive, Lin Xiangliang, said.

Dr Nandini Prabhakar, a senior scientist, has said that the use of the “backbone” will speed up the process of finding a vaccine.

Another thing worthy of note is that when the vaccine is ready, it can be administered into a patient’s body through a nasal spray, the same way the virus gets into the human body.

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Source: Briefly.co.za

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