Ayanda Borotho speaks on being bashed for celebrating her strengths

Ayanda Borotho speaks on being bashed for celebrating her strengths

- Ayanda Borotho has just been nominated for a place in this year’s list showcasing the United Nations' Most Influential People of African Descent (MIPAD), Under 40, Global 100

- Receiving the nomination made Ayanda realise that she still suffers from a wound stemming from her childhood that doesn't allow her to celebrate her wins

- Understanding the effects this has had on her, Ayanda shared her story to motivate others to heal and not to ignore the power of old wounds

PAY ATTENTION: Click “See First” under the “Following” tab to see Briefly.co.za News on your News Feed!

Actress Ayanda Borotho has courageously shared her story in the hopes of motivating other women to take a stand and make their mark.

Being a woman is not easy. So much is expected of you yet so little reward and acknowledgement are given for it – let that be your superpower, not your weakness.

Briefly.co.za Ayanda has been nominated for a place in this year’s list showcasing the United Nations' Most Influential People of African Descent (MIPAD), Under 40, Global 100 – what a powerful achievement.

MIPAD recognises people in Africa who have made an undeniable impact the public and private sectors from all over the world. Ayanda’s social activism is what has gotten her a nomination.

Receiving the nomination, Ayanda came to the realisation that she had not yet fully healed as the nomination took her by surprise, and she wanted to share this.

"I have never been someone who celebrates accolades or successes. I downplay big milestones in my life, and I often don't know how to accept a compliment. I know that comes from a brokenness from days when adults or teachers acknowledged that I was smart, other children would ostracise me for that. When I was told I was pretty, other children again ostracised me."

As a child Ayanda was labelled "vain" for celebrating achievements which led her to brush them off in her later years. Getting this nomination showed her just how much that affected her still.

Ayanda is fearless when it comes to talking about uncomfortable topics that need to be heard. Her undeniable strive to make the world better and women more powerful is beyond admirable, but even the strongest people have weaknesses.

READ ALSO: Reebok responds to AKA’s serious and public SneAKA accusations

"We (adult women) are the worst bullies. Especially emotional bullying. Of course, I deal with it better now because I understand how much of our judgement is actually a projection of our own pain. Others become a mirror of what we are or are not, what we wish for but don't have, where we are stuck or where we have not reached."

Facing old wounds, Ayanda urged people to never ignore the past that still plays a role in the present and to mend those wounds. It might seem like it is easier to ignore it but once you are fully healed, only then will you understand the power of healing.

"This is me healing the little girl who was made to feel bad for being too good. And healing the woman who stopped celebrating her greatness for fear of being disliked."

Enjoyed reading our story? Download BRIEFLY's news app on Google Play now and stay up-to-date with major South African news!

Source: Briefly.co.za

Online view pixel