Beirut explosion: 79-year-old plays uplifting piano tune amid rubble

Beirut explosion: 79-year-old plays uplifting piano tune amid rubble

- A grandmother has shown how to be calm under even the worst situations

- The woman identified as Abboud Melki chose to play the piano instead of crying when her home was destroyed

- She was not at home during the explosion, but when she got back home, she sat at the piano and played an uplifting tune

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In a video that emerged on social media, a 79-year-old grandmother could be seen playing her piano surrounded by debris in her home destroyed by the Beirut explosion of Tuesday, August 4.

The grandmother identified as May Abboud Melki played Auld Lang Syne on her piano. In the video, furniture can be seen strewn about, the walls punctured with holes, glass and debris all over the floor.

According to CNN, the septuagenarian and her husband were not at home during the massive explosion that killed at least 135 people and injured 5 000. The woman's granddaughter May-Lee Melki said the explosion destroyed her grandfather's store.

When Abboud returned to her house on Wednesday, August 5, the first thing she did was to approach her piano.

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A grandmother played 'Auld Lang Syne' on a piano surrounded by rubble from the Beirut explosion

She was not at home during the explosion, but when she got back home, she sat at the piano and played an uplifting tune. Photo credit: @The Sun/Twitter
Source: UGC

The piano is said to have been a gift from her father on her wedding day. As volunteers cleaned up the house that was in a mess, the grandmother sat at the piano and started playing.

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Meanwhile, Briefly.co.za previously reported that rescue workers are still digging through rubble searching for survivors as fires continued to burn in the Lebanese capital where an explosion killed more than 100 and injured thousands.

While the cause of the explosion was not immediately clear, Lebanon's Internal Security Chief Abbas Ibrahim said the site of the blast had been housing highly explosive materials.

Lebanon’s prime minister, Hassan Diab, blamed the catastrophe on the explosion of 2 700 tonnes of ammonium nitrate, which can be used to make fertilisers and explosives.

Major General Abbas Ibrahim also said the massive blast that shook Beirut's port was caused by confiscated high explosive materials.

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Source: Briefly.co.za

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