Zuma: If I hade 6 months as a dictator children hooked on drugs would be sent to Robben Island

Zuma: If I hade 6 months as a dictator children hooked on drugs would be sent to Robben Island

- Former president Jacob Zuma has spoken publicly for the 1st time since resigning from office

- Zuma addressed a group of learners in Nkandla and mused over what he would have done as a dictator

- He said if he were granted 6 months of dictatorship he would have sent young people hooked on drugs to Robben Island

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Former president Jacob Zuma has spoken in public for the first time since being forced to resign from office by the African National Congress (ANC). Zuma addressed a group of learners in Nkandla.

Zuma seemed to be in a fiery mood as he mused about what he would have done as a dictator to improve the lives of South Africans, particularly the youth.

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Zuma told learners if he had six months as a dictator he would send young people hooked on drugs to Robben Island and force them to study.

Briefly.co.za gathers that Zuma said if he could, he would have enacted a law that would have seen every child not in school being arrested, those doing drugs such as dagga or whoonga and who started drinking would also be arrested and sent to Robben Island.

The former president said he would have converted Robben Island into a college and forced those children who ended up there to study towards gaining a degree before they could leave.

This is not the first time Zuma has publicly spoken about being a dictator. In 2016 Zuma said he would love six months of unadulterated power to solve the unemployment problem faced by the country.

“If you just give me six months to be a dictator things will be in order. Right now to make a decision you need a resolution decision collective petition. Yoh! It’s a lot of work. I am emphasising that let us pay more attention to our children in education” Zuma said.

Zuma told learners that he introduced his controversial free tertiary education for poor students plan despite some major opposition from members of his own party and government.

Zuma refused to elaborate further on the statement but did say he made a pact not to leave government until the free education policy had been enacted. He said he had many arguments with members of his own administration in order to have the policy passed.

Zuma said his officials kept telling him there was no money for education to which he said they needed to cut spending on other projects because education was the most important project in the history of the country.

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Source: Briefly.co.za

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