WHO to say if it will trigger highest alert on monkeypox

WHO to say if it will trigger highest alert on monkeypox

WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus has voiced concern over the surge
WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus has voiced concern over the surge. Photo: Fabrice COFFRINI / AFP/File
Source: AFP

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Faced with a surge in monkeypox cases, the head of the World Health Organization is Saturday expected to declare if the agency has decided to classify the outbreak as a global health emergency -- the highest alarm it can sound.

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus will address a virtual press conference at 1300 GMT, the WHO announced in a statement late Friday.

It did not reveal what would be announced.

Monkeypox has affected over 15,800 people in 72 countries, according to a tally by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published on July 20.

A surge in monkeypox infections has been reported since early May outside the West and Central African countries where the disease has long been endemic.

On June 23, the WHO convened an emergency committee (EC) of experts to decide if monkeypox constitutes a so-called Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) -- the UN health agency's highest alert level.

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But a majority advised the Tedros that the situation, at that point, had not met the threshold.

The second meeting was called on Thursday with case numbers rising further, where Tedros said he was worried.

"I need your advice in assessing the immediate and mid-term public health implications," Tedros told the meeting, which lasted more than six hours.

A US health expert sounded a grim warning late Friday.

"Since the last #monkeypox EC just weeks ago we've seen an exponential rise in cases. It’s inevitable that cases will dramatically rise in the coming weeks & months. That’s why @DrTedros must sound the global alarm," Lawrence Gostin, the director of the WHO Collaborating Center on National and Global Health Law, said on Twitter.

"A failure to act will have grave consequences for global health."

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Warning against discrimination

A viral infection resembling smallpox and first detected in humans in 1970, monkeypox is less dangerous and contagious than smallpox, which was eradicated in 1980.

New York has already either administered or scheduled 21,500 vaccines and hopes to speed up the process
New York has already either administered or scheduled 21,500 vaccines and hopes to speed up the process. Photo: Kena Betancur / AFP/File
Source: AFP

Ninety-five percent of cases have been transmitted through sexual activity, according to a study of 528 people in 16 countries published in the New England Journal of Medicine -- the largest research to date.

Overall, 98 percent of infected people were gay or bisexual men, and around a third were known to have visited sex-on-site venues such as sex parties or saunas within the previous month.

"This transmission pattern represents both an opportunity to implement targeted public health interventions, and a challenge because in some countries, the communities affected face life-threatening discrimination," Tedros said, citing concern that stigma and scapegoating could make the outbreak harder to track.

"I am acutely aware that any decision I take regarding the possible determination of a Public Health Emergency of International Concern involves the consideration of many factors, with the ultimate goal of protecting public health," he added.

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Monkeypox
Factfile on monkeypox and its current outbreak. Photo: John SAEKI / AFP
Source: AFP

The European Union's drug watchdog on Friday recommended for approval the use of Imnavex, a smallpox vaccine, to treat monkeypox.

Imvanex, developed by Danish drugmaker Bavarian Nordic, has been approved in the EU since 2013 for the prevention of smallpox.

It was also considered a potential vaccine for monkeypox because of the similarity between the monkeypox virus and the smallpox virus.

The first symptoms of monkeypox are fever, headaches, muscle pain and back pain during the course of five days.

Rashes subsequently appear on the face, the palms of hands and soles of feet, followed by lesions, spots and finally scabs.

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Source: AFP

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