South African Study Suggests Booster Shots Offer Protection Against Omicron Related Hospitalisation

South African Study Suggests Booster Shots Offer Protection Against Omicron Related Hospitalisation

  • A South African study has found that people who have had two doses of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine are less likely to be hospitalised from Omicron
  • The booster shot for the single-dose Johnson and Johnson vaccine has become available to those who had the first dose
  • South Africans have expressed mixed opinion on the booster shot, with some applauding it and others being hesitant

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CAPE TOWN - The South African Medical Research Council conducted a study that found that people who have had two doses of the Johnson and Johnson (J&J) vaccine are less likely to be hospitalised due to Omicron.

The J&J vaccine consists of a single dose, but a booster shot has been released and is available for those who had their first doses no later than two months ago. Across Africa, health officials are encouraging people to receive the J&J booster shot.

Read also

Delta could be knocked out by Omicron, say SA scientists in new study

According to Reuters, those who have had both J&J shots are 84% less likely to require hospitalisation following an Omicron diagnosis.

South Africa, Covid-19 study, Covid-19, Omicron, Johnson and Johnson, J&J, booster shot
People who have had the J&J booster shot are less likely to require hospitalisation following an Omicron diagnosis. Image: Waldo Swiegers/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

The effects of Omicron and hopeful study results

Omicron is a more transmissible variant than its predecessors, which has caused it to spread rapidly across the world. The South African study brings much-needed hope, as people have a way of avoiding severe cases of the variant, News24 reports.

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This month 200 million doses of the J&J booster shot have been shipped globally. These will be administered mainly to people who previously received the single-dose J&J Covid-19 vaccine earlier in the year.

The South African Medical Research Council's study was spearheaded and overseen by Glenda Gray with the assistance of a research team, government funding and donations by both local and international organisations.

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Covid 19: Vaccines might be the key to avoiding overfull hospitals, Congo case study shows

Reactions to J&J booster shot results

@wheresalecia said:

"I'll take the booster how many times I need it to protect myself."

@willemlombaard remarked:

"You have a better chance of being stuck by lightning twice than developing heart problems from the vaccine."

@Mark81607413 asked:

"The go-ahead for the booster shot was only authorized a week ago, so tell me where is the data coming from?"

@micktwomey6 believes:

"This is good news for almost everyone. For others, it is an opportunity to respond in ALL CAPS with their own expert opinion. Good work J&J."

@Joe4Jersey shared:

"J&J vaccine will be one of the few popular around the world."

Covid19: Omicron spreads fast, makes cases surge in Europe, says WHO

In other Omicron-related news, Briefly News recently reported that yesterday (29 December), the World Health Organization (WHO) said that the highly transmissible nature of the Omicron variant is causing a "tsunami" of Covid-19 cases, which has broken records.

Read also

Covid19 in 2021: The year of variants, vaccines, waves and travel bans

In the past week, there have been 65.5 million new cases reported worldwide. Denmark, the United States (US) and France have reported that their current number of Covid-19 infections surpasses all previously recorded data.

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the chief of the WHO, said that Omicron's ever-rising figures can soon create a situation where the healthcare systems of different countries are unable to cope and workers will be over-exhausted.

Source: Briefly News

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